News

Monday July 31, 2017, The Globe and Mail

Last month, Fatou Bensouda, the chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, presented the tribunal’s 25th report on Darfur to the United Nations Security Council. Goodbye to the tea and crumpets of diplomatic niceties. Ms. Bensouda was angry. The council had referred the situation in Darfur to her office in March, 2005. Subsequent investigations had led to arrest warrants, most notably for Sudan’s President, Omar al-Bashir, in 2009 and 2010 for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. To date, not one of the suspects had been arrested.

The prosecutor charged the Security Council with conspicuous silence over Sudan’s non-compliance with the council’s resolutions and for its failure to confront the growing number of countries refusing to arrest indicted war criminals. [more]

Wednesday July 12, 2017, The Globe and Mail

It appears we can become accustomed to anything, provided it’s repeated often enough. What may have appalled us last year, or the year before, eventually loses its edge and is rendered normal. Think of the way highway speeding ratchets up as drivers accelerate to maintain the faster flow of traffic.

Something similar happens with language. Words accelerate. Without thoughtful restraint, they are like speeding cars, prone to accident. [more]

Join Erna Paris and a renowned panel of speakers at this London, Ontario event.

Monday, May 29th, 2017
Doors open at 6:00p.m.
(6:30pm pre-event concert).
For more information, visit Wolf Hall Debates

The question on the floor: Will a populist, anti-immigration agenda come to Ottawa in 2019? Probably yes? or, Probably no? As we’ve seen populist sentiment sweep across the United States and Europe, we wonder: will Canada be different?

Once again, we have assembled an incredible ‘brain trust’ of scholars and thinkers, who will lead us through a nuanced discussion of the possibilities, probabilities, and potentialities of Canada’s future. [more]

Monday, May 8, 2017, The Globe and Mail

A heavy sigh of relief could be heard in Brussels and across most Western capitals on Sunday after Emmanuel Macron won France’s second round of voting. Had his opponent Marine Le Pen become France’s next president, the beleaguered European Union might have taken a fatal nosedive into oblivion, further disrupting the international order.

So there’s a reprieve, but possibly just that. Mr. Macron faces formidable challenges, and a failure to meet the high bar he has set for himself could have far-reaching consequences. He’s a man of clear talent and mind-boggling ambition. But for now he’s a one-man show. And without a strong party structure, and without winning a majority in the June parliamentary elections, his bold promises may prove elusive. [more]

Monday, Jan. 16, 2017, The Globe and Mail
‘Be prepared, that’s the Boy Scouts’ marching song …” That’s how singer Tom Lehrer began one of his satirical ditties in a more innocent time. Mr. Lehrer’s borderline naughtiness appealed to the adolescents of my generation; now, as the world teeters on the edge of transition, his Boy Scout advice is even more pertinent.

No one can predict what Donald Trump will set in motion once in office. Will he disrupt Canadian trade and our basic economy? Will he wall off Mexico? Will he create a registry of Muslims? Will he reintroduce torture? [more]