ERNA PARIS is the author of seven acclaimed works of literary non-fiction and the winner of twelve national and international writing awards for her books, feature writing, and radio documentaries. Her works have been published in fourteen countries and translated into eight languages. Long Shadows: Truth, Lies, and History was chosen as one of “The Hundred Most Important Books Ever Written in Canada” by the Literary Review of Canada. In May 2007 Long Shadows inspired the Canadian House of Commons motion to apologize, on behalf of the government, to survivors of Canadian residential schools. In June 2002 it inspired a resolution in the United States House of Representatives to create a monument to American slaves on the Washington Mall. (For more information, please see Awards and Honours.)

 

The Sun Climbs Slow: The International Criminal Court and the Struggle for Justice was first on The Globe and Mail's “best book of the year” list and shortlisted for the Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing.

 

Her most recent book is From Tolerance to Tyranny: A Cautionary Tale from Fifteenth-Century Spain.

 

Erna is a member of the Honorary Council of the Canadian Centre for International Justice; a member of the Canada Committee of Human Rights Watch; a vice-president (2014) of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association; and a past chair of the Writers' Union of Canada. In 2012, Erna was awarded the World Federalist Movement – Canada World Peace Award.

 


TOLERANCE-magFrom Tolerance To Tyranny: A Cautionary Tale from Fifteenth-Century Spain, Cormorant Books

In-stores January 19, 2015

Erna is happy to announce the publication of From Tolerance to Tyranny: A Cautionary Tale from Fifteenth-Century Spain, an updated edition of her 1995 best-selling, award-winning book, The End of Days. The story of how medieval Europe’s most vibrant multicultural society became its least tolerant, with an Inquisition to purify the faith and two ethnic expulsions, continues to resonate powerfully in the first decades of the 21st century.

View the slide show: From Tolerance to Tyranny

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Wednesday, January 21, 2015, CBC Radio 1, 9:00 P.M.
FROM TOLERANCE TO TYRANNY
Christians, Muslims and Jews lived together in relative harmony in medieval Spain. Then the Spanish Inquisition came along with its use of terror and racism, turning a pluralistic society into a police state. Writer Erna Paris first explored this history for IDEAS in 1995. In a new take, she calls what happened in Spain “a cautionary tale for today.”

Listen to Erna on Ideas
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The following excerpt was published in the Ottawa Citizen January 20, 2015.

The most elusive question about tyranny is this: How are ordinary people persuaded to comply passively with injustice, or to take the next step and actively turn on neighbours with whom they may have lived in peace for decades, or even centuries? A devalued, marginalized minority seems to be the key, for exposed to a continuum of propaganda, decent human beings are transformed and desensitized.

Anti-minority propaganda labours to give birth to one and only one offspring: a population that is incrementally conditioned to accept the abuse of the excluded group. Such propaganda is not subtle; frequently it includes an attempt to depict the enemy as a blood-sucking, disease-infected, reeking metamorphosis of a despised animal or insect — in other words, as subhuman. These pointed metaphors permit decent people to reject the pariah from the community; they enable persecutors and passive onlookers to accept the unacceptable on grounds that the victim does not deserve or even need their compassion. [more]

Charlie Hebdo: Why the West has ‘fallen out of faith’ with free speech

European countries have increasingly tightened restrictions on speech
By Andre Mayer, Jan 15, 2015, CBC News

In the week since Islamic radicals killed 12 people at the offices of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, there have been solidarity marches, vocal commitments to democratic ideals — and, according to free-speech advocates, a lot of hypocrisy.

A number of influential people, including British novelist Salman Rushdie, himself the target of Muslim extremists once, are warning that a fear of Islamic radicalism is leading many Western countries to waver in their commitment to free expression. [more]

Friday, January 9, 2015, The Globe and Mail

On the volatile chess board of Israeli-Palestinian hostilities, Palestinian Authority president Mahmoud Abbas may yet capture the king. By successfully initiating Palestine’s ratification of the Rome Statute, the legal document that underlies the International Criminal Court, he has reframed the “war,” leaving his antagonists – Israel and the United States – stalemated.

According to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Palestine will assume membership in the ICC on April 1, 2015. The Palestinians have promised that their first referral to the court will be twofold: the putative war crimes committed by Israel during last summer’s Gaza war and Israel’s continuing occupation of the West Bank. [more]

Long Shadows e-book, 2014

At long last, Long Shadows: Truth, Lies, and History will soon be a Random House of Canada e-book. On sale by the end of December, 2014.

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A Dangerous Moment for Justice at the International Criminal Court

Thursday, Dec. 11 2014, The Globe and Mail The early 20th century Shakespeare scholar, A.C. Bradley, argued that the tragic hero must possess an inner flaw which will become the inevitable source of his failure. The higher his worldly status, the more poignant his downfall. This week, 100 years later, the member states that make […]

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